Tahoe Resource Conservation District

Events

Eyes on the Lake volunteers protect from aquatic invaders; celebration tonight

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Tahoe RCD in the News: a newspaper article featuring partner organizations and agencies coming together to help conserve the Upper Truckee River watershed. Tahoe RCD staff participated in a volunteer survey to collect presence/absence data of aquatic invasive plants along the upper reach of the Upper Truckee River (UTR). No aquatic invasive plant species (Eurasian watermilfoil or Curlyleaf pondweed) were found in the upper reach, however populations of the native white waterbuttercup (Ranunculus aqualitas) were found. Location data was also collected for populations of the native western pearlshell mussel.

These efforts contribute to data sets that help inform Tahoe RCD restoration projects such as Lakewide Aquatic Invasive Plant control and the restoration of Johnson Meadow. Tahoe RCD acquired the Johnson Meadow parcel in the UTR watershed last year. The purpose moving forward is to provide ecosystem and watershed protection benefits through preservation, management, and future restoration of meadow, riparian, aquatic and upland habitats in Johnson Meadow.

League to Save Lake Tahoe staff, Kelci Brown, pictured in the Upper Truckee River with a population of native white waterbuttercup. September 5, 2019

The Tahoe Daily Tribune | Staff Report | October 17, 2019

Community members, supported by staff from the League to Save Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Resource Conservation District and California State Parks, have wrapped up a three-year effort to survey the Upper Truckee River for aquatic invasive plants.

This effort will help prevent the spread of invasives during major upcoming restoration projects along the river, Lake Tahoe’s largest tributary.

“Our citizen science volunteers are some of the most passionate Tahoe lovers I have met who are always looking for meaningful ways to Keep Tahoe Blue,” exclaimed Emily Frey, the League’s citizen science program coordinator. “This type of effort allows them to dive deeper into the issues and serve as ad-hoc aquatic biologists … a truly unique and meaningful experience.”

The Upper Truckee River collects runoff from a third of the Lake Tahoe Basin and supports one of the largest wetlands in the Sierra Nevada. Historical logging, grazing, and urban development have degraded the river, and destroyed much of the wetland marsh habitat where the river meets Lake Tahoe.

Native aquatic plant called white waterbuttercup (Ranunculus aqualitas) observed in the Upper Truckee River on September 5, 2019.

This multi-year survey, conducted through the League’s Eyes on the Lake Program, mapped the location of two aquatic invasive plants: curlyleaf pondweed and Eurasian watermilfoil. These aquatic invasives pose one of the greatest threats to Lake Tahoe’s delicate ecology.

“It’s great to see community members engaged and empowered through citizen science efforts like this,” said Jen Greenberg, associate environmental planner with the California Tahoe Conservancy. “This extensive survey will help inform multi-million dollar restoration projects, including the Upper Truckee Marsh restoration.”

The Conservancy, Tahoe RCD, and California State Parks all have ongoing and future significant restoration projects located along the Upper Truckee River. These projects will help restore the resiliency of the river and its habitat to climate change, while improving water quality flowing downstream to Lake Tahoe.

Eyes on the Lake is the League’s volunteer citizen science program to help prevent the spread of aquatic invasive plants in Lake Tahoe and surrounding waters. Trained volunteers identify and report on aquatic invasive plants they find in and around Tahoe, helping to address infestations early while they are easier to control.

Survey participants began their work in 2016, surveying the river from its mouth at Lake Tahoe upstream to its crossing by US Highway 50, mapping multiple significant infestations of both curlyleaf pondweed and Eurasian watermilfoil.

In 2018, participants surveyed the next stretch of river, starting from where the 2016 effort ended and concluding at the US 50 / State Route 89 crossing near Elks Club Road.

In 2019, surveyors completed the final

A native aquatic plant species also found in the Upper Truckee River.

upstream reach to the river’s southernmost crossing of U.S. 50 in Meyers. Survey teams found no invasives in either the 2018 or 2019 surveys. Final survey maps and a report were completed by League staff and provided to land managers along the river.

“This type of collaboration between community members and Tahoe agencies can be a very powerful resource,” stated Jesse Patterson, chief strategy officer for the League. “We hope to continue to grow the army of citizen scientists here in Tahoe so we can not only raise awareness about environmental challenges facing our Lake but also provide valuable information for projects on the ground.”

 

Visit our website for more information about Aquatic Invasive Species Control Projects at Lake Tahoe.

Also find more information about the Johnson Meadow acquisition and restoration priorities. 

 

Thank you for joining us at the League to Save Lake Tahoe’s Citizen Science Celebration at Himmel Haus in South Lake Tahoe, CA on October 17, 2019.

Feinstein to Host 2019 Lake Tahoe Summit

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Press release produced by the office of Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.). Please stop by the Tahoe RCD and Tahoe Network of Fire Adapted Communities’ tables at the annual summit for information about conservation work being done in the Lake Tahoe Basin. 

 

United States Senator of California | Dianne Feinstein | July 17, 2019

Governor Newsom will deliver keynote at 23rd annual summit

Washington—Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) announced today that the 23rd annual Lake Tahoe Summit will be held on August 20, 2019, at Valhalla Tahoe in South Lake Tahoe, Calif. Governor Gavin Newsom will deliver the keynote address.

The bipartisan event will examine successful restoration projects and ways to address new challenges facing the lake. A key focus will be combating the effects of climate change and wildfire in the Lake Tahoe basin.

“I’m constantly inspired by the Tahoe community’s passion and dedication to saving the lake,” Senator Feinstein said. “Since the first summit in 1997, we’ve made tremendous progress toward restoring and protecting Lake Tahoe. Next month, we’ll join together again to celebrate that success while discussing ways to confront new challenges presented by climate change. I’m delighted that Governor Newsom will deliver this year’s keynote address and hope everyone who shares our commitment to saving Lake Tahoe will join us.”

The Lake Tahoe Summit is free and open to the public, but attendees should register in advance through the Lake Tahoe Fund’s website.

Due to limited on-site parking, attendees are encouraged to use public transportation or the complimentary shuttle service to get to and from the summit. There will also be a bicycle valet service courtesy of the Lake Tahoe Bicycle Coalition.

The first Lake Tahoe Summit was held in 1997 when President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore held a presidential forum at Lake Tahoe. The forum signaled a renewed federal commitment to the lake and helped launch a public-private sponsorship that has since invested more than $2 billion in restoration projects in the Lake Tahoe basin.

In 2000, Senator Feinstein, along with Senators Harry Reid (D-Nev.), Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) and Richard Bryan (D-Nev.), passed the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act, which authorized $300 million over 10 years to restore the lake.

In 2016, Senator Feinstein joined with Senators Reid, Boxer and Dean Heller (R-Nev.) to pass a 10-year extension of the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act, authorizing an additional $415 million for projects to improve Lake Tahoe’s water clarity, reduce risks for catastrophic wildfires, combat invasive species and protect threatened species and wildlands.

2019 Lake Tahoe Summit

Tahoe RCD to Hold Community Meeting for Input on Stormwater Resources Plan

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Public Information Meeting

The Tahoe RCD, along with agency partners, is developing a Stormwater Resource Plan (SRP). The SRP is required by the California State Water Resources Control Board to establish eligibility for bond funding for stormwater quality improvement projects. It quantifies the multiple benefits of planned stormwater projects and prioritizes them for funding.

Tahoe RCD is hosting two public meetings to introduce the concept of an SRP, present highlights of the draft SRP, and allow an opportunity for public participation.

 

The meetings will be held at the following times and locations:

December 6th, 2017 at 4 pm – City of South Lake Tahoe Council Chamber

December 7th, 2017 at 9 am – Town of Truckee East Wing Conference Room

Tahoe RCD Logo

 

Aquatic Invasive Species Trivia Night

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So you think you know about AIS? Join us Wednesday June 28th at Moe’s in Tahoe City from 5 p.m. – 8 p.m for trivia, fun, prizes, food, and drinks.

Gain a leg up on the competition and a free drink ticket by joining us from 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Trivia will start promptly at 6 p.m. 

For Facebook invite information click here

AIS Trivia Night Flyer_Web

9th Annual Landscape Conservation Workshop: Sunday August 14th 12:00pm – 3:30pm

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On Sunday August 14th  join us from 12:00 pm to 3:30 pm for the 9th annual Landscape Conservation Workshop at the Evans Family Garden.  The garden is located at 1383 Mount Olympia Circle in South Lake Tahoe.  To get to the Evans Family Garden from South Lake Tahoe travel south on Lake Tahoe Boulevard from the “Wye” to Mt. Ranier Drive, just past the Angora Creek Bridge, and take your second left onto Mt. Olympia Circle.  SIgns will be posted from Lake Tahoe Boulevard .

 The workshop will provide a unique opportunity to see demonstrations of Tahoe Friendly Landscape practices and to interact with local conservation professionals who will be there to answer questions.  Subjects that will be covered at the event include: BMPS and erosion control, gardening for wildlife, water conservation and irrigation efficiency, Fire Adapted Communities and Defensible Space, Tahoe native and adapted plants, lawn conversion practices, vegetable gardening, and composting.  We would graciously thank our  event partners: South Lake Tahoe Public Utilities District, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, California Conservation Corps, Lake Valley Fire Protection District, League to Save Lake Tahoe, and the Lake Tahoe Master Gardeners.  For more information contact Adam Henriques at ahenriques@tahoercd.org

Conservation Landscape Tour

Conservation Landscape Tour