Tahoe Resource Conservation District

Tahoe Boat Inspections

Aquatic Invasive Species Trivia Night

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So you think you know about AIS? Join us Wednesday June 28th at Moe’s in Tahoe City from 5 p.m. – 8 p.m for trivia, fun, prizes, food, and drinks.

Gain a leg up on the competition and a free drink ticket by joining us from 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Trivia will start promptly at 6 p.m. 

For Facebook invite information click here

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Tahoe Boat Inspections Move to Launch Ramps for Fall and Winter

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Starting in October boat inspections will move to select launch ramps and winter hours will begin.  Tahoe Resource Conservation District (Tahoe RCD) inspectors will be stationed at Cave Rock and Lake Forest boat launches from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. seven days a week, weather and construction permitting. All boats without an intact Tahoe inspection seal are required to get an inspection during daylight hours. Decontaminations are available at Cave Rock and Lake Forest throughout October as long as weather permits. Decontamination fees will apply for watercraft that are not clean, drained and dry. “Clean, Drain and Dry” watercraft that have been in a known infested waterbody will also require a precautionary decontamination at no cost. Boats with intact inspection seals are permitted to launch at all open launch facilities; however, inspections are only available at Cave Rock and Lake Forest.  Boaters are encouraged to confirm hours and inspection locations online at TahoeBoatInspections.com or by calling the toll-free hotline at 888-824-6267. 

“It is more efficient to move inspections back to the boat ramps with the decrease in boater traffic during the slower fall and winter months,” said Dennis Zabaglo, aquatic resources program manager at the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, “but we will continue operations at roadside inspection locations for the 2017 summer boating season.  We appreciate the continued cooperation from Tahoe boaters in helping to protect our amazing recreational resources from the threat of aquatic invasive species and supporting our nationally recognized prevention program.”

According to monitoring and scientific reports, Lake Tahoe remains free of new invasive species introductions, which are major threats to the overall health of Lake Tahoe and surrounding waterbodies. During the 2016 boating season, Tahoe RCD watercraft inspectors performed more than 7,500 inspections.  In total, more than 15,000 vessels launched at Lake Tahoe, including both newly inspected vessels and those with intact Tahoe-issued inspection seals.

As watercraft continue to arrive from high-risk waters, the importance of Lake Tahoe’s Watercraft Inspection Program remains critical. In fact, in 2016, 35 of the inspected watercraft were harboring aquatic invasive plants, mussels or snails. With our efficient roadside inspection stations, Tahoe RCD decontaminated approximately 3,500 watercraft with hot water, preventing invasive species from entering Tahoe’s waters.

“We would like to thank the thousands of boaters who arrived at our Watercraft Inspection Stations with their watercraft clean, drained and dry,” said Nicole Cartwright, aquatic invasive species program manager for Tahoe RCD. “These boaters were able to get on the water faster and avoided paying the additional fees.”

Tahoe RCD continues to support aquatic invasive species prevention efforts in the Truckee region. Tahoe RCD partnered with the Town of Truckee to provide watercraft inspections and decontaminations for Donner Lake at our Truckee-Tahoe watercraft inspection station.  Please join the Town of Truckee at 6pm Wednesday September 28th at Town Hall in the Council Chambers for their second public workshop about the future of Donner Lake’s prevention program. Tahoe RCD watercraft inspectors also educated over 3,000 boaters and paddlers about preventing the introduction of aquatic invasive species at Prosser and Boca Reservoirs in Nevada County and Stampede Reservoir in Sierra County.

Prevention efforts for over 12,000 paddlers in the Region occurred at beach kiosks, boat ramps and park entrances. Watercrafts were assessed for their risk of transporting aquatic invasive species from previously visited waterbodies. Paddlers were also educated about self-inspecting and decontaminating canoes, kayaks and paddleboards and encouraged to become a Tahoe Keeper (TahoeKeepers.org).

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Tahoe Fund Kick Starts Innovation with Grant to UV Light Pilot Project

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INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. and TAHOE CITY, Calif.  – August 22, 2016 – In an effort to spur innovation in Tahoe, the Tahoe Fund announced that it is providing the initial funds for a project that will evaluate UV light as a new method to remove aquatic invasive weeds.  This innovative approach that will be used in a pilot program at Lakeside Marina and Beach could change the way aquatic invasive weeds are controlled in Tahoe’s watershed and beyond if successful. 
 
The $5,000 grant to the Tahoe Resource Conservation District from the Tahoe Fund’s Environmental Venture Trust will help secure more than $350,000 in public and private funds to help get the project started this year.
 
“We launched the Environmental Venture Trust to get innovative projects just like this off the ground,” said Amy Berry, Tahoe Fund CEO. “It is amazing to see how a $5,000 grant can really get things going. We are excited for what this new venture can mean for Tahoe.”
 
 “We have been working with the UV light company and public funders for a while to find a way to get this pilot project launched in Tahoe, but we kept running into the roadblock of funding the very early stage work,” said Kim Boyd of the Tahoe Resource Conservation District. “With this grant from the Tahoe Fund we were able to unlock significant public funds so we can get started.”
 
The Tahoe Fund is currently seeking donors for the Environmental Venture Trust who are interested in using philanthropic dollars to help drive innovative solutions to Tahoe’s core environmental challenges.  Once the initial campaign goal of $100,000 is reached, the Tahoe Fund will request project ideas that are in need of early-stage funding to get started.
 
The Tahoe Resource Conservation District has partnered with Inventive Resources, Inc. to develop a pilot project to explore the feasibility of using UV light technology to treat and control aquatic invasive plant infestations.  New research, conducted by Inventive Resources, Inc., including bench-tested technology in a laboratory setting, indicates that UV light (a high frequency light wave) damages the DNA and cellular structure of aquatic plants and their fragments.  If determined to be feasible, UV treatment could avoid the need to use chemical herbicides to treat aquatic invasive weeds in the Tahoe Keys, which are of great concern to drinking water suppliers.  The Tahoe Fund grant will unlock funds from the California Tahoe Conservancy’s SB 630 program and potentially additional funds in the future from the US EPA.
 
Through the generosity of private donors, the Tahoe Fund has supported 15 projects in the Tahoe Basin since 2011, including more than one million dollars for a new bike path from Incline to Sand Harbor that recently broke ground. For more information about how you can contribute to the Environmental Venture Trust or other Tahoe Fund projects, please visit www.tahoefund.org.
 

 About the Tahoe Fund
The mission of Tahoe Fund is to restore and enhance the extraordinary natural environment of the Lake Tahoe Basin by building broad support and funding for projects and programs that increase the enjoyment of the region for current and future generations. The Fund focuses grants on the core areas of conservation, recreation and education/stewardship.

 

 

A Changing Lake: The Fight Against Aquatic Invasive Species

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Come join and join us for a night of hands-on activities and presentations about the past, present, and future of aquatic invasive species control and prevention efforts.

This year’s annual public forum will be held from 5:30pm – 7:30pm at the Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences in Incline Village which hosts a variety of hands on exhibits such as: an invasive species station filled with various invasive species and a timeline of introduction, including a fish tank displays with live native and invasive fish species. Step onto the boat exhibit and learn about the secchi disk and how it is used to describe Lake clarity, or take a tour of the hands-on information about Lake Tahoe and its history. Enjoy refreshments as you tour the interactive booths and learn about the numerous actions and ongoing Science that is being done to protect Lake Tahoe while the kids take part in an invasive scavenger hunt. Presentations will give participants information about Eyes on the Lake and invasive weed identification, control projects planned for 2016 and beyond, as well as a presentation from the Tahoe Keys Property Owners Association about their role in tackling invasive species (see schedule below).

6:00 – Welcome “Tahoe Keepers Video”

6:05 – “Eyes on the Lake” Invasive Weed Information

6:20 – Aquatic Invasive Species Control and Prevention Programs

6:35 – Tahoe Keys Invasive Weed Plan 

For more information or to RSVP contact Sarah Bauwens 530-543-1501 ext.126 or sbauwens@tahoercd.org.

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Lake Tahoe Roadside Boat Inspection Stations Open for Season

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Roadside stations for inspections and decontaminations of motorized boats and watercraft are officially opening for the 2016 boating season.

Locations, hours of operation and opening dates are as follows:

Opening Sunday, May 1st:

8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., 7 days a week

  • Meyers: at the junction of US 50 and Highway 89
  • Spooner Summit: at the junction of US 50 and Highway 28 in Nevada
  • Alpine Meadows: Highway 89, off Alpine Meadows Road north of Tahoe City

Opening Thursday, May 19th:

8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., Thursday-Sunday, CLOSED Monday-Wednesday

  • Truckee-Tahoe: Highway 267, off Truckee Airport Road

 “Boat inspections are critical to maintaining the health of Lake Tahoe and our local recreation-based economy,” said Dennis Zabaglo, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency’s Aquatic Resources Program Manager.  “Through the efforts of the Tahoe Resource Conservation District’s trained inspectors and other private and public partners committed to the Lake, we expect to have another successful season.”

All motorized watercraft require inspection for aquatic invasive species (AIS) prior to launching into Lake Tahoe, Fallen Leaf Lake and Echo Lake. Invasive species are highly advantageous and can be transported by non-motorized water recreation equipment as well. The Tahoe Keeper program was created to inform the paddling community about the importance of inspecting equipment, including: kayaks, paddleboards, fishing equipment, inflatable water toys and life jackets.

Invasive species, such as quagga mussels, New Zealand mudsnails, and hydrilla, are known to multiply quickly and colonize underwater surfaces, including docks and piers, water supply and filtration systems, buoys, moored boats, and even the beautiful rocky shoreline.  They destroy fish habitat, ruin boat engines, and can negatively impact water quality and the local economy, recreation, and ecosystem.  Boats and other watercraft are the largest transporters of AIS, and the inspection program is critical to preventing their spread into Lake Tahoe and other waterbodies.  Knowingly transporting AIS into Lake Tahoe is against the law, and violators may be subject to monetary penalties.

 “Boaters are encouraged to Clean, Drain, and Dry their boats prior to arriving at inspection stations in order to save time and money,” according to Nicole Cartwright, AIS Program Coordinator for the Tahoe Resource Conservation District, “make sure to drain all water, even water from your garden hose used to flush. Taking these three simple steps will get you on the water faster.”

 Annual watercraft inspection fees remain unchanged from last year. The “Tahoe In & Out” inspection ranges from $35 for personal watercraft and vessels under 17 feet and up to $121 for vessels over 39 feet. The “Tahoe Only” inspection sticker is $30. An additional fee of $35 is charged for any boat requiring decontamination and an additional $10 fee for the decontamination of ballast tanks or bags. 

 For more information on aquatic invasive species prevention, control, and early detection join us for our Spring Public Forum. The event is located this year at the Tahoe Environmental Research Center in Incline Village on June 14th from 5:00-7:30 p.m. Event details and information on the inspection program and AIS can be found by visiting TahoeBoatInspections.com or calling (888) 824-6267.