Tahoe Resource Conservation District

Community Watershed Planning

Tahoe RCD in partnership with STPUD is hosting FREE Water Conservation Workshops

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Don’t miss out on these Water Conservation Workshops being held on the North and South shores of Lake Tahoe! These workshops are great for professionals as well as residents, and discuss a variety of topics dealing with ways to conserve water in the current drought situation we are experiencing. 

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Get Small BMP Retrofit Plans Approved Electronically

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Homeowners, contractors, and consultants can submit plans for small BMP Retrofit proposals that disturb less than 7 cubic yards and get an approval online.

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NOTICE

If any of the following conditions apply to the proposed BMP installation then a BMP Retrofit Permit applicationor another TRPA application may be necessary and the project will NOT be eligible for a Small BMP Retrofit Plan approval.

• Engineered structures, such as retaining walls over 3 feet 
• Extensive grade alterations
• Infiltration systems capturing runoff from areas greater than 2,500 square feet
• Excavation of over 5 feet
• Paving
• Subsurface conveyance systems (piping) and drop inlets 
• More than 7 cubic yards of grading

Applicants should be prepared to submit 3 items through the TRPA Citizen Access Database for a quick and easy paperless process. No trips to the TRPA offices!

Required Three Items

1. Site Plan that includes:
     • Parcel Boundaries 
     • Map scale (if applicable) and north arrow 
     • Assessor’s Parcel Number (APN) and property address 
     • Location and label for all BMPs to be implemented 
     • Existing coverage (building footprint, driveway, walkways) and stormwater flow lines 
     • Locations of stream environment zones (SEZ), if present 

 2. BMP Treatments Form

 3. Calculation Spreadsheet

Small BMP Retrofit Plan detailed instructions
Example 1 of a Small BMP Retrofit Plan
Example 2 of a Small BMP Retrofit Plan

 Standard Conditions for applicants using the Small BMP Retrofit plan

  • Approval of the type, sizing, and location of BMPs is based upon the reviewer’s assumption that the applicant has accurately and completely measured impervious areas contributing to infiltration systems.
  • All areas displaying erosion or bare soil must be noted on the site plan and re-vegetated or otherwise stabilized. Vehicular access must be limited to paved areas in order for a parcel to be eligible for Certificate of Completion of BMPs. Parking barriers may be necessary in order to be compliant with this requirement.
  • Small BMP Retrofit plans are not a verification of land coverage, land capability, or use, nor are they a conceptual approval of any future project. Land coverage cannot be verified, transferred or banked through a Small BMP Retrofit plans. These verifications require the submittal of a separate application to TRPA for review and approval. 

Best Management Practices (BMP) Workshops-Grow Your Own, Nevada!

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How to Design and Install BMPs for Residences and Small Businesses

 

Choose from two workshops:

 Half-Day Refresher Workshop on April 29 at the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, 128 Market Street, Stateline, Nevada for those who have completed the Basic or Refresher Workshop within the past two years. Registration fee includes the 2012 NRCS Standard Drawings Booklet, workshop materials and refreshments.

Full-day Basic Best Management Practices (BMP) Workshop on April 24 at the Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences on the campus of Sierra Nevada College in Incline Village, Nevada. Registration fee includes the 2012 NRCS Standard Drawings Booklet, workshop materials and refreshments. Lunch is on your own.

Whether you attend on April 24 or April 29, you will:

 Find out how construction and landscaping activities can contribute to water pollution in Lake Tahoe and how to interpret a BMP Site Evaluation to install BMPs as required by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency.

Become familiar with new developments in the BMP Retrofit Program at Lake Tahoe.

BMP Workshop Topics for 2015:

  •  How to use TRPA’s online resources.
  • New electronic approval for small BMP retrofit design.
  • Commercial and multi-family residential BMP permits and maintenance.
  • How to qualify your business for the 2015 BMP Installation Service Providers List. Attendance by at least one supervisor per business is required.

Registration Information:

 Space is limited, so register early. For specific workshop questions, contact University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, 775-336-0244.

 After you register, please visit Pre-class reading. Much of the content of the BMP workshops involves interpretation of a BMP Site Evaluation given to homeowners. Please familiarize yourself with the general content of all four components of this site evaluation: Recommended treatments, Site plan, Attachment 1 and BMP Treatment Descriptions. See also the new forms for electronic approval of your design.

 Online Registration:

http://www.growyourownnevada.com/horticulture-programs/best-management-practices-bmp-workshops/

Register by Mail:

 Send registration form and check payable to “Board of Regents” to University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, 4955 Energy Way, Reno, NV 89502. Call 775-336-0244 if you have questions.

 At-the-Door Registration:

 To ensure adequate seating, class materials and refreshments, please register in advance online or by mail. Walk-in registrants will be assessed a higher class fee of $55 for the Basic Workshop and $45 for the Refresher Workshop.

 Refund Policy:

 Cancellations after April 13, 2015, may receive a partial refund (minus the cost of refreshments). Registrants who do not cancel and do not attend will not be eligible for a refund. Persons in need of special accomodations or assistance must contact Ashley Andrews, andrewsa@unce.unr.edu, at least three days prior to the scheduled workshop. Cooperative Extension is an EEO/AA institution.

 BMP Workshop Quick Links:

Benefits for Participants

Workshop Agendas

Registration Form

Partners

Pre-class reading

Directions

Contact BMP Workshop

BMP Workshops Home

 

 

The 2014 Field Season has Ended

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Photo of Private Garden Tahoe BMPs

After a busy field season the Tahoe RCD will no longer be offering BMP or Landscape Conservation assistance until further notice. Please visit the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Stormwater Program website for BMP resources, TahoeBMP.org. To learn more about Tahoe Friendly Landscaping Practices, contact the UCCE Master Gardeners of Lake Tahoe at http://cecentralsierra.ucanr.edu/Master_Gardeners/LTMG/

Thank you for taking action to stop stormwater pollution in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Learn more about what you can do on the stormwater webpage and follow us on Facebook.

Don’t miss the resources on our Landscape Conservation webpage and check back to learn how your property can become Tahoe Friendly Landscape Certified in 2015.

All our services are grant funded and subject to change.

Thank you! 

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Frequently Asked Questions: BMPs

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What is the Environmental Improvement Program?

The Environmental Improvement (EIP) Program is a comprehensive restoration program launched in 1997 as a private and public partnership launched after the 1997 Lake Tahoe Presidential Forum to protect and improve Lake Tahoe Basin’s natural and recreational resources. Hundreds of EIP projects are completed each year focusing on improving air, water, and scenic quality, forest health, fish and wildlife, and public access to the Lake and other recreation areas to improve the environment.  Many are water quality improvement and erosion control projects which incorporate stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) implemented by the City, the Counties and state highways to reduce urban stormwater runoff to improve Lake clarity and near-shore conditions.

What is Urban Stormwater Runoff?

During rain storms and other precipitation events, hard surfaces such as roadways, concrete and rooftops carry stormwater to nearby storm drains and rivers that lead to Lake Tahoe instead of allowing the water to percolate through the soil. This natural filtering process is important for protecting Lake Tahoe’s clarity. The sediment and associated nutrients in stormwater runoff also feed algae and aquatic invasive species which negatively affect water quality, habitat, and aesthetic and recreation opportunities.

Do I still need to do my BMPs?

Yes. All private and public property owners in the Basin are required to install and maintain water quality Best Management Practices (BMPs) on developed properties. BMPs are proven methods that prevent sediment and nutrients from entering our waters, can help slow or reverse the loss of Lake clarity and improve near shore conditions. The push for program participation by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency may heighten when local stormwater jurisdictions are implementing EIP projects in your neighborhood. These water quality improvement projects collect and treat stormwater from the public roads, and the right-of-way. The public is being asked to do their part as well by installing BMPs that typically include: paving dirt driveways, protecting soil under roof drip lines, stabilizing or retaining steep slopes and loose soil, and vegetating and mulching bare soils, and installing stormwater retention systems which capture stormwater allowing it to soak into the soil instead of runoff the property. 

What is Source Control?

Source control BMPs are measures taken to specifically keep soil from leaving the property.  This approach excludes stormwater infiltration systems such as drywells and infiltration basins when infiltration isn’t feasible due to steep slopes or high groundwater. When these measures are implemented on properties where stormwater infiltration is challenging, the TPRA has issued BMP Source Control Certificates to recognize that the property owner has implemented these basic sediment control measures. In some instances, private property owners have been able to install joint stormwater infiltration systems, due to limitation on one or more individual properties, which have allowed all of the properties to receive TRPA BMP Certificates of Completion.

What is Area-wide Stormwater Treatment?

Area-wide stormwater treatment is a new approach to implementing cost efficient and effective urban stormwater management practices. A handful of these area-wide projects are underway in the Tahoe Basin to ensure capture and treatment of urban stormwater runoff where conditions such as proximity to lake, high ground water, or steep slopes can limit stormwater infiltration.  When these conditions exist, property owners may find that installing and maintaining BMPs on their property is significantly more challenging and costly. Participation in area-wide stormwater projects can offer incentives such as reduced capital outlay costs, joining a public-private partnership to maximize state and local funding and reduced maintenance costs.

What does the CWP program have to do with BMPs?

In order to assist with pollutant load reductions to Lake Tahoe, the Community Watershed Partnership (CWP) Program supports implementation of the Basin’s Environmental Improvement Program (EIP), a cooperative public/private effort to preserve, restore and enhance the environment of the Lake Tahoe Region. Through the development of the CWP Program the Tahoe Resource Conservation District (Tahoe RCD), the Nevada Tahoe Conservation District (NTCD), and the Natural Resources Conservation Services (NRCS) have provided extensive technical assistance and education to private property owners in order to contribute to the reduction of pollutants that effect Lake Tahoe’s unique clarity, beauty and bountiful natural resources for future generations.

Why do I want to practice Lake Friendly Landscaping?

Lake friendly landscaping encourages sustainable practices that protect the region’s natural resources in our own backyards and communities. Lake friendly landscaping encourages property owners to use water, fertilizer and pesticides wisely, and to use native and adapted plants to benefit wildlife habitat while reducing soil erosion and wildfire risk. Through the CWP program, property owners can participate in Lake friendly landscape stewardship practices in a fun and creative way.